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GreenStar Panels http://greenstarpanels.com The World's Best Insulation Sun, 16 Oct 2016 21:39:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 Greenstar Panels Dealer Certification Training http://greenstarpanels.com/greenstar-panel-dealer-certification-training/ http://greenstarpanels.com/greenstar-panel-dealer-certification-training/#comments Fri, 03 Aug 2012 19:59:22 +0000 http://greenstarpanels.com/?p=2081 Greenstar Panels, the leaders in Hyper-Insulation is proud to announce that we have established the dates for the Dealer Certification Training. If you would like to become a Greenstar Panels Certified Installer, now is your opportunity.

The training will be held at the Contractor’s Institute in Winter Garden, FL
There will be two options for the class. A One Day class that briefly discusses zero energy and weatherization processes, and then trains you with hands-on demonstration.
The other option is a Two Day class. The first day is spent covering all aspects of zero energy and energy efficiency. The second day is focused on Greenstar Panels. You will learn how to install, inspect, detail, and vent the panels.
Each class will leave you with the tools you need to become a Greenstar Panels Certified Installer.

TO REGISTER: Call 1-877-LICENSE
For more information, call: 863-940-4791

*Contractors will receive CEU’s after completing the course.

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Blog post with lightbox gallery http://greenstarpanels.com/hello-world-2-3/ http://greenstarpanels.com/hello-world-2-3/#respond Sat, 07 Jan 2012 09:59:53 +0000 http://epic.weblusive.com/?p=1 Serrano ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit cras ultricies dictum luct Sed lacinia velit a orci arg tincid et sagittis erat egestas vestibulum vestibulum aliquet elit ac aliquet phasellus at dolor vel metus atu accumsan lobortisie morbi Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit cras ultricies dictum luct Sed lacinia velit a orci arg tincidunt et sagittis erat egestas vestibulum vestibulum elit ac aliquet phasellus at dolor vel metus atu accumsan lobortisie morbi Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet dolor vel metus

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Image links to single post http://greenstarpanels.com/hello-world-2-2/ http://greenstarpanels.com/hello-world-2-2/#respond Mon, 19 Dec 2011 13:31:11 +0000 http://epic.weblusive.com/?p=1 Serrano ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit cras ultricies dictum luct Sed lacinia velit a orci arg tincid et sagittis erat egestas vestibulum vestibulum aliquet elit ac aliquet phasellus at dolor vel metus atu accumsan lobortisie morbi Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipiscing elit cras ultricies dictum luct Sed lacinia velit a orci arg tincidunt et sagittis erat egestas vestibulum vestibulum elit ac aliquet phasellus at dolor vel metus atu accumsan lobortisie morbi Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet dolor vel metus

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Insulation Comparison http://greenstarpanels.com/insulation-comparison/ Tue, 04 Oct 2011 15:40:59 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1963 Insulation Comparison

Fiberglass

Fiberglass insulation is made of silica sand and recycled glass, both abundant resources. Producing fiberglass insulation requires melting the materials in a fossil fuel–burning furnace, which consumes substantial amounts of energy and generates greater amounts of air pollution than the manufacture of other insulation types.

If installed properly, there is little danger of inhaling fibers, which are throat, eye, and skin irritants. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration still requires cancer warning labels on fiberglass insulation products.
[ Read More about Fiberglass>> ]

Cotton

Cotton insulation is made mostly of cotton—a natural, renewable resource—with a small amount of boron as a flame retardant and some polyester. Cotton insulation has a similar R-value to cellulose for a given thickness of insulation.

The majority of cotton used in insulation is recovered from scrap generated in denim manufacturing; one company makes insulation with 85 percent recycled content. Cotton farming is very water- and pesticide-intensive, though manufacturing cotton insulation overall is not a very energy-intensive process.
[ Read More about Cotton >> ]

Cellulose

Cellulose insulation is made primarily from recycled paper. About 75 percent of the material used to make cellulose insulation is post-consumer waste paper, giving it the highest average recycled content of all insulation types.

The manufacture of cellulose insulation involves a fraction of the energy use and pollution required to make mineral wool and fiberglass insulation. Additionally, scrap cellulose generated during installation can be reused, cutting down on waste.
[ Read More about Cellulose>> ]

Spray Foam

Spray Insulation: The chemical insulation agent that is stored in canisters and sprayed into walls, holes and cracks with a special application device; it then expands and dries, forming a barrier. It can be used to supplement existing insulation or plugs leaks. Spray Foam Insulation Problem: Without a radiant barrier, when the roof gets very hot (as in summer), it radiates solar-generated heat down into the attic insulation. Spray insulation primarily reduces heat transfer by trapping warm air. It has a high radiant heat transfer rate and is a very good radiator of this absorbed and retained heat. As surfaces radiate infrared rays in all directions, the heat trapped in spray insulation during the day will radiate down through the ceiling into the air-conditioned living space at night even if the night cools down. [ Read More about Spray Foam>> ]

Mineral Wool

Mineral wool is made of strands of minerals, either from abundant rock or the recycled slag from iron-ore blast furnaces. The EPA requires that mineral wool contain at least 70 percent recycled content by weight, second only to cellulose. The proportion of recycled materials in mineral wool can surpass 90 percent; look for high recycled content and ask if you don’t see the information displayed.

Though more expensive than cellulose and fiberglass, mineral wool is more durable and moisture-resistant.

[ Read More about Mineral Wool>> ]

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Reflectivity and Air Spaces http://greenstarpanels.com/reflectivity-and-air-spaces/ Mon, 26 Sep 2011 21:25:29 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1822

In order to retard heat flow by conduction, walls and roofs are built with internal air spaces. Conduction and convection through these air spaces combined represent only 20% to 35% of the heat which pass through them. In both winter and summer 65% to 80% of the heat that passes from a warm wall to a colder wall or through a ventilated attic does so by radiation.

The value of air spaces as thermal insulation must include the character of the enclosing surfaces. The surfaces greatly affect the amount of energy transferred by radiation, depending on the material’s absorptivity and emissivity, and are the only way of modifying the total heat transferred across a given space. The importance of radiation cannot be overlooked in problems involving ordinary room temperatures.

The following test results illustrate how heat transfer across a given air space may be modified. The distance between the hot and cold walls is 1-1/2″ and the temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces are 212 degrees and 32 degrees, respectively. In CASE 1, the enclosing walls are paper, wood, asbestos or other similar material. In CASE 2, the walls are lined with aluminum foil. In CASE 3, two sheets of aluminum foil are used to divide the enclosure into three 1/2″ spaces.



Conduction 21 BTUs
Convection 92 BTUs
Radiation 206 BTUs
TOTAL 319 BTUs
CASE 1, UNINSULATED WALL SPACE The surfaces of ordinary building materials, including ordinary bulk insulation have a low radiation or emissivity rate, and a heat ray absorption rate of over 90%. Air has low density, so conduction is slight (only 21 BTUs). Convection currents transfer 92 BTUs.



Conduction 21 BTUs
Convection 92 BTUs
Radiation 10 BTUs
TOTAL 123 BTUs
CASE 2, THE SAME WALL SPACE EXCEPT that the inner surfaces were lined with sheets of aluminum foil of 3% emissivity and absorptivity. Note the drastic drop in heat flow by radiation, from 206 BTUs to 10 BTUs. Conduction and convection are unchanged. The original total heat loss of 319 BTUs drops to 123 BTUs.



Conduction 23 BTUs
Convection 23 BTUs
Radiation 2 BTUs
TOTAL 48 BTUs
CASE 3, TWO SHEETS OF (5% EMISSIVE) ALUMINUM FOIL divide the wall space into 3 reflective compartments. Heat loss by radiation drops 94% from Case 1. The 2 interior sheets retard convection so that its flow falls 75%. Conduction rises only 2 BTUs; from 21 BTUs to 23 BTUs. The total heat loss drops 85% from Case 1.

Reflection and emissivity by surfaces can ONLY occur in SPACE. The ideal space is any dimension 3/4″ or more. Smaller spaces are also effective, but decreasingly so. Where there is no air space, we have conduction through solids. When a reflective surface of a material is attached to a ceiling, floor or wall, that particular surface ceases to have radiant insulation value at the points in contact.

Heat control with aluminum foil is made possible by taking advantage of its low thermal emissivity and the low thermal conductivity of air. It is possible with layered foil and air to practically eliminate heat transfer by radiation and convection: a fact employed regularly by the NASA space program. In the space vehicle Columbia, ceramic tiles are imbedded with aluminum bits which reflect heat before it can be absorbed. “Moon suits” are made of reflective foil surfaces surrounding trapped air for major temperature modification.

HEAT LOSS THROUGH AIR

There is no such thing as a “dead” air space as far as heat transfer is concerned, even in the case of a perfectly airtight compartment such as a thermos bottle. Convection currents are inevitable with differences in temperature between surfaces, if air or some other gas is present inside. Since air has some density, there will be some heat transfer by conduction if any surface of a so-called “dead” air space is heated. Finally, radiation, which accounts for 50% to 80% of all heat transfer, will pass through air (or a vacuum) with ease, just as radiation travels the many million miles that separate the earth from the sun.

Aluminum foil, with its reflective surface, can block the flow of radiation. Some foils have higher absorption and emissivity qualities than others. The variations run from 2% to 72%, a differential of over 2000%. Most aluminum insulation has only a 5% absorption and emissivity ratio. It is impervious to water vapor and convection currents, and reflects 95% of all radiant energy which strikes its air-bound surfaces.

HEAT LOSS THROUGH FLOORS

Heat is lost through floors primarily by radiation (up to 93%). When ALUMINUM insulation is installed in the ground floors and crawl spaces of cold buildings, it prevents the heat rays from penetrating down, reflecting the heat back into the building and warming the floor surfaces. Since aluminum is non-permeable, it is unaffected by ground vapors.

CONDENSATION

Water vapor is the gas phase of water. As a gas, it will expand or contract to fill any space it may be in. In a given space, with the air at a given temperature, there is a limited amount of vapor that can be suspended. Any excess will turn into water. The point just before condensation commences is called 100% saturation. The condensation point is called dew point.

VAPOR LAWS

1. The higher the temperature, the more vapor the air can hold; the lower the temperature, the less vapor.
2. The larger the space, the more vapor it can hold; the smaller the space, the less vapor it can hold.
3. The more vapor in a given space, the greater will be its density.
4. Vapor will flow from areas of greater vapor density to those of lower vapor density.
5. Permeability of insulation is a prerequisite for vapor transmission; the less permeable, the less vapor transfer.

The average water vapor saturation is about 65%. If a room were vapor-proofed, and the temperature were gradually lowered, the percentage of saturation would rise until it reached 100%, although the amount of vapor would remain the same. If the temperature were further lowered, the excess amount of the vapor for that temperature in that amount of space would fall out in the form of condensation. This principle is visibly demonstrated when we breathe in cold places. The warm air in our lungs and mouth can support the vapor, but the quantity is too much for the colder air, and so the excess vapor for that temperature condenses and the small particles of water become visible.

In conduction, heat flows to cold. The under surface of a roof, when cold in the winter, extracts heat out of the air with which it is in immediate contact. As a result, that air drops in temperature sufficiently to fall below the dew point (the temperature at which vapor condenses on a surface). The excess amount of vapor for that temperature that falls out as condensation or frost attaches itself to the underside of the roof.

Water vapor is able to penetrate plaster and wood readily. When the vapor comes in contact with materials within walls, having a temperature below the dew point of the vapor, moisture or frost is formed within the walls. This moisture tends to accumulate over long periods of time without being noticed, which in time can cause building damage.

To prevent condensation, a large space is needed between outer walls and any insulation which permits vapor to flow through. Reducing the space or the temperature converts vapor to moisture which is then retained. The use of separate vapor barriers or insulation that is also a vapor barrier are alternate methods to deal with this problem. Aluminum is impervious to water vapor and with the trapped air space is immune to vapor condensation.

Learn More >>

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Advantages of Radiant Barrier http://greenstarpanels.com/radiant-barrier-advantages-disadvantages/ Sun, 25 Sep 2011 21:37:53 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1802 Reflective insulation and radiant barriers reduce the radiation of heat to or from the surface of a material. Radiant barriers will reflect radiant energy. A radiant barrier by itself will not affect heat conducted through the material by direct contact or heat transferred by moist air rising or covection. For this reason, trying to associate R-values with radiant barriers is difficult and inappropriate. The R-value test measures heat transfer through the material, not to or from its surface. There is no standard test designed to measure the reflection of radiated heat energy alone. Radiated heat is a significant means of heat transfer; the sun’s heat arrives by radiating through space and not by conduction or convection. At night the absence of heat (i.e. cold) is the exact same phenomenon, with the heat radiating described mathematically as the linear opposite. Radiant barriers prevent radiant heat transfer equally in both directions. However, heat flow to and from surfaces also occurs via convection, which in some geometries is different in different directions.

Reflective aluminum foil is the most common material used as a radiant barrier. It has no significant mass to absorb and retain heat. It also has very low emittance values “E-values” (typically 0.03 compared to 0.90 for most bulk insulation) which significantly reduces heat transfer by radiation.

Types of radiant barriers

  • Foil or foil laminates.
  • Foil-faced polyurethane or foil-faced polyisocyanurate panels.
  • Foil-faced polystyrene. This laminated, high density EPS is more flexible than rigid panels, works as a vapor barrier, and works as a thermal break. Uses include the underside of roof sheathing, ceilings, and on walls.
  • Foil-backed bubble pack. This is thin, more flexible than rigid panels, works as a vapor barrier, and resembles plastic bubble wrap with aluminum foil on both sides. Often used on cold pipes, cold ducts, and the underside of roof sheathing.
  • Light-colored roof shingles and reflective paint. Often called cool roofs, these help to keep attics cooler in the summer and in hot climates. To maximize radiative cooling at night, they are often chosen to have high thermal emissivity, whereas their low emissivity for the solar spectrum reflects heat during the day. Metal roofs; e.g., aluminum or copper.

Radiant barriers can function as a vapor barriers and serve both purposes with one product.

Materials with one shiny side (such as foil-faced polystyrene) must be positioned with the shiny side facing an air space to be effective. An aluminum foil radiant barrier can be placed either way – the shiny side is created by the rolling mill during the manufacturing process and does not affect the reflectivity of the foil material. As radiant barriers work by reflecting infra-red energy, the aluminum foil would work just the same if both sides were dull.

Types of reflective insulation
Reflective insulation is commonly made of either aluminum foil attached to some sort of backing material or two layers of foil with foam or plastic bubbles in between creating an airspace to reduce convective heat transfer also. The aluminum foil component in reflective insulation will reduce radiant heat transfer by up to 97%. As reflective insulation incorporates an airspace to reduce convective heat flow, it carries a measurable R-Value.

Advantages
Very effective in warmer climates
No change thermal performance over time due to compaction, disintegration or moisture absorption
Thin sheets takes up less room than bulk insulation
Can act as a vapor barriers
Non-toxic/non-carcinogenic
Will not mold or mildew
Radon retarder, will limit radon penetration through the floor

Disadvantages
Must be combined with other types of insulation in very cold climates
May result in an electrical safety hazard where the foil comes into contact with faulty electrical wiring

Source Wikipedia: [Learn More about Insulation>>]

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HERS: Home Energy Rating System http://greenstarpanels.com/hers-home-energy-rating-system/ Tue, 20 Sep 2011 19:12:07 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1851 > View Monthly AC/Heating Estimate of $21.00: Energy Summary Report >> View Case Study #1 for Madrid Home Retrofit: View Case Study What This Means A Home Energy […]]]>

Temperature of our model home on a Florida summer day (unfinished)


Oasis Verde – New Model Home

View Our Preliminary HERS Rating of 53: Energy Rating Report >>

View Monthly AC/Heating Estimate of $21.00: Energy Summary Report >>

View Case Study #1 for Madrid Home Retrofit: View Case Study


What This Means

A Home Energy Rating is a measurement of a home’s energy efficiency, used primarily in the United States. Home energy ratings can be used for either existing homes or new homes. A home energy rating of an existing home allows a homeowner to receive a report listing options for upgrading a home’s energy efficiency. The homeowners may then use the report to determine the most effective ways in which to upgrade the home’s energy efficiency. A home energy rating of a new home allows buyers to compare the energy efficiency of homes they are considering buying.

A home energy rating can be used to gauge the current energy efficiency of a home or estimate the efficiency of a home that is being constructed or improved. A home energy rating of a home prior to construction or improvement is called a “projected rating.” A home energy rating that is used to determine a home’s current efficiency is referred to as a “confirmed rating.”

Energy assessments take into account different climatic conditions in different parts of the country and are bench-marked according to average household energy consumption particular to a given climatic region.

Ratings provide a relative energy use index called the HERS Index – a HERS Index of 100 represents the energy use of the “American Standard Building” and an Index of 0 (zero) indicates that the building uses no net purchased energy (a Zero Energy Building). The lower the value, the better.

Projected ratings give home owners and builders an estimate of what a home’s efficiency will be like after construction or improvements, so that they may determine the most cost-effective route to improve a building’s efficiency. A confirmed rating, which indicates the home’s current efficiency, requires an inspection of the home from an energy rater. The home energy rater reviews the home to identify its energy characteristics, such as insulation levels, window efficiency, wall-to-window ratios, the heating and cooling system efficiency, the solar orientation of the home, and the water heating system. Performance testing, such as a blower door test for air leakage and duct leakage, is usually part of the rating. Learn More >>

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Heat Gain / Loss in Buildings http://greenstarpanels.com/heat-gain-loss-in-buildings/ Fri, 16 Sep 2011 21:19:57 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1795

There are three modes of heat transfer: CONDUCTION, CONVECTION, and RADIATION (INFRARED). Of the three, radiation is the primary mode; conduction and convection are secondary and come into play only as matter interrupts or interferes with radiant heat transfer. As matter absorbs radiant energy, it is heated and a gradient temperature develops, which results in molecular motion (conduction in solids) or mass motion (convection in liquids and gas).
All substances, including air spaces and building materials (such as wood, glass, plaster and insulation), obey the same laws of nature and TRANSFER heat. Solid materials differ only in the rate of heat transfer, which is mainly affected by differences in density, weight, shape, permeability and molecular structure. Materials which transfer heat slowly can be said to RESIST heat flow.

Direction of heat transfer is an important consideration. Heat is radiated and conducted in all directions, but convected primarily upward. The figure below show modes of heat loss by houses. In all cases, radiation is the dominant mode.

CONDUCTION is direct heat flow through matter (molecular motion). It results from actual PHYSICAL CONTACT of one part of the same body with another part, or of one body with another. For instance, if one end of an iron rod is heated, the heat travels by conduction through the metal to the other end; it also travels to the surface and is conducted to the surrounding air, which is another, but less dense, body. An example of conduction through contact between two solids is a cooking pot on the solid surface of a hot stove. The greatest flow of heat possible between materials is where there is a direct conduction between solids. Heat is always conducted from warm to cold, never from cold to warm, and always moves via the shortest and easiest route.

In general, the more dense a substance, the better conductor it is. Solid rock, glass and aluminum-being very dense-are good conductors of heat. Reduce their density by mixing air into the mass, and their conductivity is reduced. Because air has low density, the percentage of heat transferred by conduction through air is comparatively small. Two thin sheets of aluminum foil with about one inch of air space in between weigh less than one ounce per square foot. The ratio is approximately 1 of mass to 100 of air, most important in reducing heat flow by conduction. The less dense the mass, the less will be the flow of heat by conduction.

CONVECTION is the transport of heat within a gas or liquid, caused by the actual flow of the material itself (mass motion). In building spaces, natural convection heat flow is largely upward, somewhat sideways, not downward. This is called “free convection.”

For instance, a warm stove, person, floor, wall, etc., loses heat by conduction to the colder air in contact with it. This added heat activates (warms) the molecules of the air which expand, becoming less dense, and rise. Cooler, heavier air rushes in from the side and below to replace it. The popular expression “hot air rises” is exemplified by smoke rising from a chimney or a cigarette. The motion is turbulently upward, with a component of sideways motion. Convection may also be mechanically induced, as by a fan. This is called “forced convection.”

RADIATION is the transmission of electromagnetic rays through space. Radiation, like radio waves, is invisible. Infrared rays occur between light and radar waves (between the 3 -15 micron portion of the spectrum). Henceforth, when we speak of radiation, we refer only to infrared rays. Each material that has a temperature above absolute zero (-459-7 F.) emits infrared radiation, including the sun, icebergs, stoves or radiators, humans, animals, furniture, ceilings, walls, floors, etc.
All objects radiate infrared rays from their surfaces in all directions, in a straight line, until they are reflected or absorbed by another object. Traveling at the speed of light, these rays are invisible, and they have NO TEMPERATURE, only ENERGY. Heating an object excites the surface molecules, causing them to give off infrared radiation. When these infrared rays strike the surface of another object, the rays are absorbed and only then is heat produced in the object. This heat spreads throughout the mass by conduction. The heated object then transmits infrared rays from exposed surfaces by radiation if these surfaces are exposed directly to an air space.

The amount of radiation emitted is a function of the EMISSIVITY factor of the source’s surface. EMISSIVITY is the rate at which radiation (EMISSION) is given off. Absorption of radiation by an object is proportional to the absorptivity factor of its surface which is reciprocal of its emissivity.

Although two objects may be identical, if the surface of one were covered with a material of 90% emissivity, and the surface of the other with a material of 5% emissivity, the result would be a drastic difference in the rate of radiation flow from these two objects. This is demonstrated by comparison of four identical, equally heated iron radiators covered with different materials. Paint one with aluminum paint and another with ordinary enamel. Cover the third with asbestos and the fourth with aluminum foil. Although all have the same temperature, the one covered with aluminum foil would radiate the least (lowest [5%] emissivity). The radiators covered with ordinary paint or asbestos would radiate most because they have the highest emissivity (even higher than the original iron). Painting over the aluminum paint or foil with ordinary paint changes the surface to 90% emissivity.

Materials whose surfaces do not appreciably reflect infrared rays, i.e.: paper, asphalt, wood, glass and rock, have absorption and emissivity rates ranging from 80% to 93%. Most materials used in building construction — brick, stone, wood, paper, and so on — regardless of their color, absorb infrared radiation at about 90%. It is interesting to note that a mirror of glass is an excellent reflector of light but a very poor reflector of infrared radiation. Mirrors have about the same reflectivity for infrared as a heavy coating of black paint.

The surface of aluminum has the ability NOT TO ABSORB, but TO REFLECT 95% of the infrared rays which strike it. Since aluminum foil has such a low mass to air ratio, very little conduction can take place, particularly when only 5% of the rays are absorbed.

TRY THIS EXPERIMENT: Hold a sample of FOIL INSULATION close to your face, without touching. Soon you will feel the warmth of your own infrared rays bouncing back from the SURFACE. The explanation: The emissivity of heat radiation of the surface of your face is 99%. The absorption of aluminum insulation is only 5%. It sends back 95% of the rays. The absorption rate of your face is 99%. The net result is that you feel the warmth of your face reflected.

[Learn More about Foil Insulation>>]

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Expanded Polystyrene Foam (EPS) http://greenstarpanels.com/about-eps/ Fri, 16 Sep 2011 21:05:47 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1786

Advantages

  • Environmentally Friendly: Contains no dyes, formaldehyde or ozone-depleting HCFCs, may contain recycled material and is 100% recyclable.

 

  • Insect and Mold Resistant: Can be manufactured with an inert additive that deters termites and carpenter ants. Also, does not sustain mold and mildew growth.

 

  • Stable R-Value: Has no thermal drift. Designers are well served knowing that the thermal properties will remain stable over its entire service life.

 

  • Proven Performance: The same fundamental EPS chemistry has been in use since the mid-1950s, so the actual performance of the product is well known.

 

  • Water-Resistant: Does not readily absorb moisture from the environment.

 

  • Cost-Effective: Is typically less expensive than comparable insulation products.

 

  • Code Approvals: Is recognized by the International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC-ES), for numerous applications.

 


Description

Expanded Polystyrene Foam (EPS) insulation uses fossil fuels in the production of plastic resin as well as for processing, finishing, and transportation to make and deliver the product. Crude oil and natural gases are also used as raw material inputs for EPS. The greenhouse gasses related to the manufacturing and transportation of the product is an investment. The use of foam insulation on a building significantly increases the R-Values of walls and therefore saves energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions of the useful life of the building to save energy.

Technical and Code Information
Expanded polystyrene (EPS) isn’t just foam insulation; it’s also an innovative building material that meets the requirements for the design and structural integrity of many building projects. Since the 1950s, EPS has been recognized as a mainstream insulation material, but over the past decade, new applications using EPS have exploded. EPS now serves as a powerful design element in “greenbuilding practices”. Today the EPS industry uses highly sophisticated processes and technologies to manufacture cost-effective, environmentally responsible products.

EPS insulation products have been the subject of extensive research and evaluation over its lifespan. Encompassing a multitude of construction applications from roofing to below grade, the EPS industry stands behind its products with real-world test results. Research data from third party testing laboratories such as Oakridge National Laboratories, National Research Council of Canada, Florida Solar Energy Center, Intertek EL SEMKO and Structural Research, Inc. lend confidence to specifiers, architects and contractors alike.

Uses

Our insulation is successfully used in numerous commercial, industrial and residential applications. The following are examples of its many uses.

  • Commercial Roofing
  • Insulation
  • Architectural Shapes
  • Metal Roof Flute-Fill
  • Void Fill
  • Pre-cast/Pre-stressed
  • Concrete Panels
  • Foundations
  • Retaining Walls
  • Sheathing
  • Interior Wall Insulation
  • Exterior Insulation
  • Finishing Systems (EIFS)
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HYPER-insulation http://greenstarpanels.com/hyper-insulation/ Fri, 16 Sep 2011 20:58:41 +0000 http://sitesthatpop.com/~greensta/?p=1777

Hyper-insulation with Triple Protection From Heat


Radiant Barrier, Ventilation and Insulation

GreenStar Panels are designed to protect the building envelope in 3 ways and keep the heat from ever entering your attic. Typical attics though vented, can reach temperatures in excess of 160 degrees on a summer day. This heat works its way into the house making it hot and uncomfortable. Most of your electric costs are a result of trying to overcome that heat. GreenStar Panels have the solution by expelling the heat before it gets into your attic. Now your AC system operates in a cooler attic which makes it more efficient and last longer. You can now utilize your attic space for additional storage uncluttering valuable living area.


Radiant Heat Barrier

Aluminum reflects 97% of the sun’s radiant heat. But in the process the aluminum get extremely hot. Touching a foil wrapped baked potato or a foil wrapped corn cob just out of the oven would not be wise. If you do you could get burned. It would be much safer to use an oven mitt to protect your hand. A radiant barrier in an attic works the same way if not insulated. The aluminum’s surface temperature transfers the heat into your attic negating the radiant heat barrier’s effectiveness.


Ventilation & Air Barrier

When the radiant barrier is properly insulated and ventilated, the surface temperature of the roof will not have time to heat up your attic. The heat naturally moves upward through a 1” convection channel, effectively moving up and out before it can heat up your attic. The soffit vents pull cool air up through the air channel and out the roof ridge vent instead of entering your attic. With our GreenStar Panel’s patent pending design, air is allowed to pass through an channel under the roof deck and above the 3” EPS insulation panel. This creates an air gap that prevents the sun’s radiant heat from heating your attic space.


Attic Insulation

The use of a radiant barrier with insulation keeps surface heat from transferring much slower. Heat will eventually transfer into the attic with enough time. Air does not transfer heat through conduction making it a good insulator. The one inch of airspace combined with the 3-inch EPS panel will stop any measurable heat from entering the attic by conduction. Our 3” GreenStar Panels gives an R-12 protection against any conductive heat transfer. It is easy to hold a foam cup filled with hot soup but the same soup in a metal cup could burn your hand. That’s how EPS stops heat from conduction into your attic.


Compare the Difference

Discover why a Greenovative home has a $25/mo. AC cost! Learn More >>

View Case Study #1 for Madrid Home Retrofit: View Case Study




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